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#LeilaniEstatesEruption #KilaueaVolcano UPDATE: USGS spots new island of lava a few meters offshore from northernmost part of the ocean entry

#LeilaniEstatesEruption #KilaueaVolcano UPDATE (July 13 at 9 PM): According to USGS HVO geologists: “A tiny new island of lava has formed on the northernmost part of the ocean entry. During this morning's overflight, HVO's field crew noticed the island was oozing lava similar to the lava oozing from the broad flow front along the coastline. A closer view of the new "island," which was estimated to be just a few meters offshore, and perhaps 6-9 meters (20-30 ft) in diameter. It's most likely part of the fissure 8 flow that's entering the ocean—and possibly a submarine tumulus that built up underwater and emerged above sea level. A robust plume (center) was observed this morning at the southern end of the ocean entry, which had migrated about 300 m (985 ft) to the west. The ocean front east of Kapoho appeared to be reduced, with a more diffuse laze plume this morning (upper left). This Hawaiʻi County Fire Department aerial image shows Kapoho Crater with the most active branch of the fissure 8 lava channel now to the west (right) of the cone and feeding a robust ocean entry. The path of the fissure 8 channel prior to being diverted can be seen east (below and left) of the crater; despite no visible surface connection between this branch and the sea, lava continues to feed a broad ocean entry, forming a diffuse laze plume. Sink holes (dark spots to right of large tree) are beginning to form along fractures beneath the field of tephra that has formed downwind of fissure 8. Tephra (Pele's hair and other airborne volcanic glass fragments) from the fissure 8 lava fountains continues to fall downwind, covering the ground within a few hundred meters (yards) of the active vent. High winds can waft lighter particles to greater distances. Residents are urged to minimize exposure to these volcanic particles, which can cause skin and eye irritation similar to volcanic ash. Fissure 8 continues to be the primary erupting vent on Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone, although several other fissures were observed steaming during this morning's overflight. This aerial image shows the fissure 8 vent (near center), channelized flow, and distant ocean entry (upper right). The braided lava channel extending from the fissure 8 vent (near top, center) and flowing toward the ocean. Some of the abandoned connector channels were more obvious in this morning's light than on previous days. Continuation of the main fissure 8 channel, which is now flowing on the west side of Kapoho Crater (left) and was entering the ocean about 300 meters west of the Kapoho ocean entry this morning (steam plume in far distance).” Stay tuned to Hawaii News Now for the very latest developments #HInews #HawaiiNews #HNN #HawaiiNewsNow #WeAreYourSource

Опубликовано Mileka Lincoln Пятница, 13 июля 2018 г.

USGS spots new island of lava a few meters offshore from northernmost part of the ocean entry

(July 13 at 9 PM): According to USGS HVO geologists: “A tiny new island of lava has formed on the northernmost part of the ocean entry. During this morning’s overflight, HVO’s field crew noticed the island was oozing lava similar to the lava oozing from the broad flow front along the coastline.

A closer view of the new “island,” which was estimated to be just a few meters offshore, and perhaps 6-9 meters (20-30 ft) in diameter. It’s most likely part of the fissure 8 flow that’s entering the ocean—and possibly a submarine tumulus that built up underwater and emerged above sea level. A robust plume (center) was observed this morning at the southern end of the ocean entry, which had migrated about 300 m (985 ft) to the west. The ocean front east of Kapoho appeared to be reduced, with a more diffuse laze plume this morning (upper left). This Hawaiʻi County Fire Department aerial image shows Kapoho Crater with the most active branch of the fissure 8 lava channel now to the west (right) of the cone and feeding a robust ocean entry. The path of the fissure 8 channel prior to being diverted can be seen east (below and left) of the crater; despite no visible surface connection between this branch and the sea, lava continues to feed a broad ocean entry, forming a diffuse laze plume. Sink holes (dark spots to right of large tree) are beginning to form along fractures beneath the field of tephra that has formed downwind of fissure 8. Tephra (Pele’s hair and other airborne volcanic glass fragments) from the fissure 8 lava fountains continues to fall downwind, covering the ground within a few hundred meters (yards) of the active vent. High winds can waft lighter particles to greater distances. Residents are urged to minimize exposure to these volcanic particles, which can cause skin and eye irritation similar to volcanic ash. Fissure 8 continues to be the primary erupting vent on Kīlauea’s lower East Rift Zone, although several other fissures were observed steaming during this morning’s overflight. This aerial image shows the fissure 8 vent (near center), channelized flow, and distant ocean entry (upper right). The braided lava channel extending from the fissure 8 vent (near top, center) and flowing toward the ocean. Some of the abandoned connector channels were more obvious in this morning’s light than on previous days. Continuation of the main fissure 8 channel, which is now flowing on the west side of Kapoho Crater (left) and was entering the ocean about 300 meters west of the Kapoho ocean entry this morning (steam plume in far distance).” Stay tuned to Hawaii News Now for the very latest developments

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